BOLD

The Northwest Tribal Elders Project Building Our Largest Dementia (BOLD) Infrastructure

The Northwest Tribal Elders project fosters the Northwest tribes ensuring our tribal elders receive satisfactory health and wellness services and resources. We are currently funded on a cooperative agreement that focuses focus on capacity building, program, and policy development, mobilizing partnerships, providing health education and promotion, and training and technical assistance to our member tribes in areas that will enhance community development and health equity.

CDC collaborated with tribal leaders across the nation to develop and implement the Healthy Brain Initiative and the Road Map for Indian Country (RMIC). This is a first-ever public health guide focused on dementia in AI/AN communities.  NPAIHB is the first AI/AN CDC funded collaborative grant. The HBI/RMIC is a community engagement tool that can empower tribal communities to:

  • Understand effects of dementia in tribal communities
  • Understand and provide training and resources to caregivers and providers
  • Identify prevention, early detection and preventive strategies for public health approaches
Barb Bold
What is Dementia?

Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning — thinking, remembering, and reasoning — to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person’s functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.

What Is Dementia? Symptoms, Types, and Diagnosis | National Institute on Aging (nih.gov)

Are Native American and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) impacted by Dementia? Alzheimer’s Association reported in a report that 1 in 3 AIAN will develop ADRD

10 Warning Signs & Symptoms Signs

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an early stage of memory loss or other cognitive ability loss (such as language or visual/spatial perception) in individuals who maintain the ability to independently perform most activities of daily living. Click here to read more.

Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms eventually grow severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other cognitive abilities serious enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60-80% of dementia cases. Click here to read more. 

  • Early Detection: The importance of being assessed, and what is next?
  • Risk Reduction: Prevention, managing modifiable risk-factors Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Prevention
  • Caregiver’s: Caregiving and caregivers. Stay-in-home care.

About Us

Funded by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention Healthy Brain Initiative

Recipient from the Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cooperative agreement awards for the Healthy Brain Initiative (HBI): BOLD Public Health Programs to Address Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (AD/RD) in Indian Country. The project will be titled The Northwest Tribal Elder’s Project. (see links)

CDC collaborated with tribal leaders across the nation to develop and implement the Healthy Brain Initiative and the Road Map for Indian Country (RMIC). This is a first-ever public health guide focused on dementia in AI/AN communities.  NPAIHB is the first AI/AN CDC funded collaborative grant. The HBI/RMIC is a community engagement tool that can empower tribal communities to:

  • Understand effects of dementia in tribal communities
  • Understand and provide training and resources to caregivers and providers
  • Identify prevention, early detection and preventive strategies for public health approaches

Coming Soon:

History of Northwest Elders Project

Brain Health

Northwest Tribal Dementia Network and Coalition

Goals

Topics

  • Strengthen and foster the growth of dementia workforce at the tribal community-level
  • Support Northwest Tribes to promote Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) risk reduction, early detection and caregivers support strategies
  • Implement clinical and community-based prevention programs
  • Provide training and technical assistance
  • Provide ongoing education and awareness/learning opportunities for individuals needing care, caregivers, and clinical providers
  • Training, tools and resources for caregivers
  • Early detection assessment and screening tools
  • Risk Reduction
  • Support and Resources
  • Elder Care resources

Contact

Chandra Wilson, MSW (The Klamath Tribes)

Wyatt Miner (Cheyenne River Sioux)

Project Director

503-750-7914

cwilson@npaihb.org

Project Assistant

605-218-0705

wminer@npaihb.org

Training and Training Information Requests

Caregivers

CHRS & CHWs

Webinar Series: Topics and presentations in collaboration with other chronic health programs, and clinical and education and awareness programs

Upcoming Save The Dates

Savvy Caregiver Training

Webinar: Periodontal Disease and Alzheimer's Disease

Current Highlights

First Annual Northwest Tribal Brain Health and Dementia Summit

On July 11-13, 2023 over 30 Northwest Tribes gathered at the Swinomish Casino Resort, in Anacortes, Washington on the Swinomish Reservation home to a community of Coastal Salish People. This was the for the First Annual Northwest Tribal Brain Health and Dementia Summit. For 2 ½ days we gathered together and shared Brain Health and Dementia resources and stories from our Northwest Tribes. The gathering was an opportunity to address the continued gap in the knowledge and awareness about dementias through Tribal communities and learn more about Risk Reduction, Benefits of Early Detection, and Caregiver support and to provide knowledge, resources and awareness of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) among American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN).

Continue Reading

“It is estimated that one in three American Indian and Alaska Native older adults 65 and older may receive a dementia diagnosis over the next 25 years”

(Mayeda, Glymour, Quensenberry, & Whitmer, 2016)

 

We recognize that this area of healthcare has a limited workforce capacity within our tribes, and that we may face many challenges ahead and with this gathering and collaboration of tribal leaders, health programs, clinical providers and ADRD experts together we addressed Brain Health and Dementia in our tribal communities. The Summit provided presentations that included information, education, and awareness to address brain health and memory/cognitive decline and ADRD. Presentations included: The Alzheimer’s Association, The Healthy Brain Initiatives, Road Map for Indian Country, International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), Dementia Friendly AI/AN Communities, Framing, Recognizing, and Responding to Elder Abuse in Indian Country, and additional presentations related to music, memory, and Tribal community ADRD programs. In addition, many of our attendees received their certification of Completion of the Dementia Friendly AI/AN Communities information webinar provided by the IA2 team – working towards becoming a Dementia Friend Champion.  Lastly, The Banner Alzheimers Institute’s Native American Outreach Program provided a half-day Caregiver Support Training, going through their Caregiver Support Toolkit. 

 

We ended both Summit days with daily reflections, and listening sessions where we discussed among our relatives’ questions to stimulate conversations not limited to how each tribal community is addressing ADRD and supporting Caregivers – we shared stories, and we celebrated life together with laughter, tears, songs, dances and prayers. We shared about our tribal traditions, and the importance of implementing them into tribal programs – and how many of our tribal programs have been weaving traditional ways into their daily delivery of care. Mostly importantly, we made new relationships and strengthen old ones, and observed in our presence who our Dementia Champions are that we made formation that we are the Northwest Tribal Dementia Network, and that we want to foster our relationships and support one another as we walk this journey to bring awareness and education to our member tribes, one-step at a time, together. We are not alone!

Resources

Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Strategic Plan

Top 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimers

Road Map for Indian Country

Links

BOLD Public Health Centers Excellence of Dementia

Areas of excellence: Risk Reduction, Early Detection, Dementia Caregiving

Funding source

THIS RESOURCE WAS PRODUCED AND SUPPORTED THROUGH FUNDING BY CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, NATIONAL CENTER FOR CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM GRANT #1NU58DP006923-11-00