NPAIHB

NPAIHB COVID-19 Update

Established in 1972, the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB or the Board) is a non-profit tribal advisory organization serving the forty-three federally recognized tribes of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Our mission is to eliminate health disparities and improve the quality of life of American Indians and Alaska Natives by supporting Northwest Tribes in their delivery of culturally appropriate, high quality healthcare.

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Providing health-related research, surveillance, training and technical assistance to improve the quality of life of American Indians and Alaskan Natives

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Northwest Member Tribes

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All forty-three federally recognized tribes in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are members, or Delegates, of the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board

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View our entire resource library of materials related to many areas of Indian Health. 

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We’re looking for the people with ideas that spark change and inspire collaboration throughout everything we do.

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Clinicians can have a big impact on improving outcomes for pregnant and parenting people experiencing substance use disorders.

Learn more here: www.indiancountryecho.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/3-Getting-Help-for-Substance-Use-During-Preg...

#IndianCountry #tribalhealth #publichealth #SubstanceAbusePrevention #substanceabuseawareness
... See MoreSee Less

Clinicians can have a big impact on improving outcomes for pregnant and parenting people experiencing substance use disorders. Learn more here: https://www.indiancountryecho.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/3-Getting-Help-for-Substance-Use-During-Pregnancy.pdf#indiancountry #tribalhealth #publichealth #substanceabuseprevention #substanceabuseawareness

Today is World AIDS Day! Let's take a moment and consider what AIDS is, and how we can fight to eradicate it.

AIDS is caused by an HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection which can be passed through bodily fluids like sex, contact with blood, and sharing needles. HIV and AIDS are not the same thing, and an individual with HIV will not always develop AIDS.

HIV attacks your immune system and harms your ability to fight normally non-life threatening diseases like the common cold, pneumonia, and the seasonal flu. AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is the disease caused by damage that HIV does to your immune system and takes around 10 years to develop if HIV is left untreated. Symptoms of HIV include fever, chills, body rashes, swollen lymph nodes, chronic fatigue, and mouth ulcers.

While American Indian/ Alaska Native groups frequently face higher rates of disease and illness and are systemically disadvantaged when receiving medical care; AN/AN populations are statistically less likely to be infected by HIV than any other ethnic group in the United States.

However, according to the IHS, rates of HIV in Indian Country have increased more than 34% since 2012 and President Biden's 2020 fiscal year report included the allocation of $25 million in funds for the IHS' 'Eliminating Hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS in Indian Country Initiative'.

It is important to always be aware of the risk of HIV. Anyone can contract HIV and develop AIDS. Protect yourself by using birth control like condoms and dental dams; NEVER share needles, and be cautious when treating another person's open wounds.

There is no cure for HIV or AIDS, but there are treatments that can greatly slow the growth of HIV and protect loved ones around you from contracting the virus themselves. PrEP pills are currently the most effective preparatory treatment for HIV when taken as prescribed and reduces the risk of HIV transmission by 74%.

PrEP should be taken by individuals who have a partner with HIV, inject drugs, or who have been treated for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) within the last six months. Adolescents can also take PrEP as can individuals who are pregnant or breastfeeding to protect their born/unborn child from contracting HIV.

There is no shame in contracting HIV and infected individuals can live long and healthy lives if diagnosed early and treated properly. If you are concerned about symptoms, contact your local medical clinic for an antigen/antibody blood test.

For more information, check out our resources at www.npaihb.org/hiv/

#IndianCountry #WorldAIDSDay #aidsprevention #stdprevention #publichealth
... See MoreSee Less

Today is World AIDS Day! Lets take a moment and consider what AIDS is, and how we can fight to eradicate it.AIDS is caused by an HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection which can be passed through bodily fluids like sex, contact with blood, and sharing needles. HIV and AIDS are not the same thing, and an individual with HIV will not always develop AIDS.  HIV attacks your immune system and harms your ability to fight normally non-life threatening diseases like the common cold, pneumonia, and the seasonal flu. AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is the disease caused by damage that HIV does to your immune system and takes around 10 years to develop if HIV is left untreated. Symptoms of HIV include fever, chills, body rashes, swollen lymph nodes, chronic fatigue, and mouth ulcers. While American Indian/ Alaska Native groups frequently face higher rates of disease and illness and are systemically disadvantaged when receiving medical care; AN/AN populations are statistically less likely to be infected by HIV than any other ethnic group in the United States. However, according to the IHS, rates of HIV in Indian Country have increased more than 34% since 2012 and President Bidens 2020 fiscal year report included the allocation of $25 million in funds for the IHS Eliminating Hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS in Indian Country Initiative.It is important to always be aware of the risk of HIV. Anyone can contract HIV and develop AIDS. Protect yourself by using birth control like condoms and dental dams; NEVER share needles, and be cautious when treating another persons open wounds. There is no cure for HIV or AIDS, but there are treatments that can greatly slow the growth of HIV and protect loved ones around you from contracting the virus themselves. PrEP pills are currently the most effective preparatory treatment for HIV when taken as prescribed and reduces the risk of HIV transmission by 74%.PrEP should be taken by individuals who have a partner with HIV, inject drugs, or who have been treated for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) within the last six months. Adolescents can also take PrEP as can individuals who are pregnant or breastfeeding to protect their born/unborn child from contracting HIV. There is no shame in contracting HIV and infected individuals can live long and healthy lives if diagnosed early and treated properly. If you are concerned about symptoms, contact your local medical clinic for an antigen/antibody blood test. For more information, check out our resources at https://www.npaihb.org/hiv/ #indiancountry #worldaidsday #aidsprevention #stdprevention #publichealth
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