Diabetes ECHO

Diabetes prevalence in American Indian and Alaska Native populations in the Northwest is greater than 1.5 times that of non-Hispanic whites (BRFSS, 2006-2012). Despite the high prevalence, access to specialists in Indian Health Service, Tribal and Urban clinics is limited. Our aim is to provide comprehensive information, resources and expertise to integrate evidence-based treatment for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, optimize blood sugar control in tribal communities with holistic, culturally appropriate care, improve patient outcomes and improve quality of life.

All IHS, Tribal and Urban clinics are invited to attend and participate. We welcome you to submit a case presentation form and/or join the teleECHO clinic The 1 hour long virtual clinic includes an opportunity to present cases, receive recommendations from specialists and peers, engage in a didactic session and become part of a learning community. Together we can make a difference by ensuring that our people are receiving the care they need, when they need it, in their own community.

When: Launching May 9, the 1 hour virtual clinics will take place the second Thursday of every month at 12pm PST. 

How to Join: Subscribe to our email listserv by clicking here or text SDPI to 97779 to sign up for our text message service. We’ll be sure to send you the connect information each month.

Present your case for best practice recommendations from your peers and specialists. If you would like to present, please complete the case presentation form and send via email (wtdp@npaihb.org) or fax (503.228.4801) Download the case presentation form

If you have any questions please contact wtdp@npaihb.org

What is the Diabetes ECHO?

The goal of this program is to increase the capacity of Indian Health Service, Tribal and Urban Indian clinics to safely and effectively treat patients with diabetes.

 The Diabetes ECHO, through the use of video conferencing, education, and research, increases knowledge of providers and health care professionals and strengthens best practice of care for all patients

Our Focus

Diabetes prevalence in Native American Communities is greater than 1.5 times that of non-Hispanic whites. Despite the high prevalence, access to specialists in IHS, Tribal and Urban Indian clinics is limited. Optimizing blood sugar control in tribal communities would improve patient outcomes and improve quality of life.

• Improve quality of clinical services

• Enhance community-clinical relationships

• Increase experts in the field

• Adopt cultural practices

Didactic Presentations

Type 1 vs Type 2 Diabetes – April 12 2018

Project ECHO Overview and Discussion – May 10, 2018

Pediatric Diabetes – June 14, 2018

Prevention of Macrovascular Complications of Diabetes – July 12, 2018

Helping with Diabetes – Avoiding Harm – May 2, 2019

Diabetic Retinopathy and Neuropathy – August 9, 2018

Interdisciplinary Care at Shoshone-Bannock – September 13, 2018

Helping with Diabetes – Avoiding Harm – May 2, 2019

How Nez Perce is Engaging Patients with Diabetes (Available soon) – May 9, 2019