Diabetes Community of Practice

Diabetes prevalence in American Indian and Alaska Native populations in the Northwest is greater than 1.5 times that of non-Hispanic whites (BRFSS, 2006-2012). Despite the high prevalence, access to specialists in IHS, Tribal and Urban clinics is limited. Our aim is to provide resources and expertise to optimize blood sugar control in tribal communities, improve patient outcomes and improve quality of life. In order to increase the capacity of IHS, Tribal and Urban Indian staff to safely and effectively treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the Northwest Tribal Epidemiology Center (NWTEC) is starting a Diabetes Community of Practice.

All IHS, Tribal and Urban clinics are invited to attend and participate. We welcome you to submit a case presentation form and/or join the community of practice The 1 hour long session includes an opportunity to present cases, receive recommendations from specialists and peers, engage in a didactic session and become part of a learning community. Together, we will manage patients so that our people get the care they need.

When: Launching in May, sessions will take place monthly. Stay tuned for the exact date/time.

How to Join: Be the first to know when the sessions will take place by subscribing to our email listserv by clicking here or text SDPI to 97779 to sign up for our text message service. We’ll be sure to send you the connect information each month.

Present your case for best practice recommendations from your peers and specialists. If you would like to present, please complete the case presentation form and send via email (wtdp@npaihb.org) or fax (503.228.4801) Download the case presentation form

If you have any questions please contact wtdp@npaihb.org

What is the Diabetes Community of Practice?

The goal of this program is to increase the capacity of Indian Health Service, Tribal and Urban Indian clinics to safely and effectively treat chronic, common, and complex conditions.

 The Diabetes Community of Practice, through the use of video conferencing, education, and research, increases knowledge of providers and health care professionals and strengthens best practice of care for all patients

Our Focus

Diabetes prevalence in Native American Communities is greater than 2 times that of non-Hispanic whites. Despite the high prevalence, access to specialists in IHS, Tribal and Urban Indian clinics is limited. Optimizing blood sugar control in tribal communities would improve patient outcomes and improve quality of life.

• Improve quality of clinical services

• Enhance community-clinical relationships

• Increase experts in the field

• Adopt cultural practices